Delivering enhanced social mobility

by Michael Brown June 10, 2014

Michael Brown, the former Vice Chancellor of Liverpool John Moores University reflects on his new report: ‘Higher Education as a tool of social mobility: Reforming the delivery of HE and measuring professional graduate output success’. Michael looks at the problem with purely focusing on ‘input’ measures rather than ‘output’ and suggests new ways to measure the positive social mobility outcomes in the sector. As well as looking ahead to the future, Michael reflects on the sector’s reaction to these ideas and the debate surrounding the report.

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Searching for gender balance at the top

by Ben Tucker June 4, 2014

Responding to recommendations in the latest Leadership Foundation report in to leadership and gender, Ben Tucker takes a look at his own industry – executive headhunters to unpick the experience of women in applying for senior jobs. With an unacceptable gender imbalance remaining, Ben looks at how and why people apply for jobs in the sector, as well as how panels make their final decision.

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Anderson appreciated

by David Malcolm June 2, 2014

On the 54th Anniversary of the publication of Grants to Students – also known as the ‘Anderson Report’, David Malcolm reassesses its legacy for higher education. Re-examining Sir Colin Anderson’s life, and responding to some of the recent criticisms levelled against him in the context of the 2012 system, today we revisit this much-overlooked report and the man that set in motion a period of radical change for UK higher education.

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The high cost of higher education

by Carl Lygo May 30, 2014

Reviewing the recent HEPI/HEA Student Experience Survey, Carl Lygo looks at what students want from their university experience contrasted with the high price that the sector and politicians assume that universities need. Carl questions why fellow vice chancellors have allowed their salaries to rise faster than their staff and questions why a university education really needs to cost so much.

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Fees still haunt the Lib Dems

by Dewi Knight May 28, 2014

Following a disastrous result at the European and Council elections, it seems that the Lib Dems are still haunted by the 2010 decision to raise tuition fees. With Nick Clegg facing challenges to his leadership and with a General Election now less than a year away, Dewi Knight takes a look at the state of the Lib Dems and their fractious relationship with higher education policy.

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The rising tide

by Mark Leach May 22, 2014

Last night The Guardian kicked off a major new investigation in to how some private HE colleges are abusing student loans. These revelations, along with those that are planned to follow it over the coming days, are damaging to the whole sector. With the Queens Speech just days away, the Government has one final chance to provide the legal underpinning to allow respectable institutions to thrive, and crack down on those that are exploiting the system.

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The higher education case for Europe

by Chris Hale May 20, 2014

In the week of the European Elections and with Europe high up in the UK’s political debate, Chris Hale takes a look at the higher education policy case for EU membership. With much of EU policy and legislation going above the heads of many in the UK, there are several key themes that matter tremendously to university and require the sector’s full engagement at home and in Brussels.

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Australian free for all

by Gavin Moodie May 16, 2014

As the Australian Government announces radical reforms to higher education in its budget this week, including a lifting of the cap on fees, Gavin Moodie reviews these new changes, their possible implications on institutional and student behaviour and makes important comparisons to the UK system.

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Creating a regulatory system in English HE

by Andrew Boggs May 14, 2014

The recent movement of teaching funding from public grants to student fees has triggered a wider discussion about reform of the higher education regulatory system in England. In this piece, Andrew Boggs of the Higher Education Better Regulation Group looks at the challenges posed by designing a single regulatory regime and what may need to be considered by policymakers in the next Parliament as they look towards ironing out regulation of English HE.

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